Beware the Ides of March #history #blackluck #Urban Fantasy

: By Vincenzo Camuccini – Own work, user: Rlbberlin, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2168603

Welcome to Cathy Brockman’s wonderful blog today, and thanks for stopping by. If you’re a regular visitor to her blog, you know she does a wonderful job in keeping with the theme of the month. I’ve never been a particularly superstitious person, but for some reason I’m always been aware of the Ides of March, which falls on March 15th.  Have you heard the saying: “Beware of the Ides of March” but didn’t know for sure where or how it originated? No? Well, I’m about to share that information with you and hope you enjoy reading about the origins.

Around the world, thousands of people mark the 15th of March with cautious observance. Whether you’re superstitious or not, most everyone has heard the saying: Beware The Ides of March. But where did the date and saying originate?

The Ides of March is the day on the Roman calendar that corresponds to March 15  (Click here for an in-depth look at how the Romans observed their calendar.). March 15th marks the day in 44 BC that Roman leader Julius Caesar was assassinated by a group of Senators he considered allies. Caesar had been warned by a seer (supposedly named Spurinna) that he would come to harm no later than the Ides of March,  On his way to the Senate, Caesar joked “The Ides of March have come,” to which the seer replied, “Aye, Caesar, but not gone.”

Minutes later, Caesar was dead., stabbed to death by a group of Senators.

March 15 also marked the time when Roman citizens paid outstanding debts, making it another black-luck day for many people.

The combination of Caesar’s assassination and a version of Roman tax day gave March 15 its own historical black eye. It also marked the time of great transformation, as Caesar’s death was the central event that marked the transition from Roman Republic to the Roman Empire.

The dark reputation of March 15th also reappeared in William Shakespeare’s 1601 play “Julius Caesar” with the warning “Beware the Ides of March,” something, of course, Caesar failed to do.  The phrase evolved after these events to represent any unheeded warning.

Other Notable March 15 events

Caesar’s assassination isn’t the only historical event to occur on March 15. Some others include:

  • In 1493, Christopher Columbus arrived back in Spain after his first New World voyage.
  • In 1820, Maine was admitted as the 23
  • 1913, Woodrow Wilson holds the first presidential press conference
  • 1917, Nicholas II, the last Russian Tsar, abdicates
  • 1966, racial riots erupted in the Watts section of Los Angeles
  • 1985, the first Internet domain name, symbolics.com, is registered

So now you know when you hear Beware the Idea of March or, The Ides of March is here, why people say that.

* * *

Thanks so much for stopping by Cathy’s blog to read about The Ides of March. I’d love to share with you my latest urban fantasy release, I Spy A Demon.

About I Spy A Demon

When twins Cecily and Calder Sizemore’s parents are killed in a car accident, they’re adopted by the Frost family—Gus, Mae and their sons, Marcel and Elliott. Over the years, Cecily’s love for Marcel evolves into anything but sisterly.

Cecily always knew something was amiss in the Frost household. Little things belied the calm, peaceful ambiance Mae did her best to portray. Calder tried to warn her things were not as they appeared, but she didn’t want to believe him. When Calder begs her to leave Des Moines, start a new life away from the secrets, away from the Frosts and away from Marcel, she takes his advice and her shattered heart and moves to Minnesota.

Now she’s been called home for her beloved brother’s funeral. There’s more to the story than meets the eye. Discrepancies in how her twin died lead her back to Des Moines, and back to Marcel―the boy who stole her heart, the man whose very presence turns her blood to liquid fire. Marcel has always kept dangerous secrets, but this time, Cecily is determined to uncover the truth about the Frosts… and the truth about how Calder really died.

She’ll find out what really happened to her brother, even if it’s her last act in life.

“I found myself completely immersed in the story. The chemistry between Cecily and Marcel is powerful and undeniable.”

“A paranormal/urban fantasy love story that will draw you in from the very first page until the very end.”

I had the pleasure of reading this one and I agree with all of the above. Check out my review on Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/3172633793? or Amazon under Cat’s reviews and at TTCbooks&more http://www.ttcbooksandmore.com/2020/03/cats-review-of-i-spy-demon-demon-hunter.html? So for 99 cents this is a great deal.

Download I SPY A DEMON – 99 cents

Keta’s Bio

Keta Diablo lives in the Midwest part of the United States on six acres of gorgeous woodland. When she isn’t writing or gardening, she loves to commune with nature. A pair of barn owls returns to the property every year to birth their young and show them off in the high branches of the oak trees. Nothing more adorable than these white fluffy babies with heart-shaped faces. A lifelong animal lover, Keta devotes her time and support to the local animal shelter. Emma LaPounce, a rescued feline, has been her furry companion for the last ten years.

Keta is an award-winning and Amazon bestselling author who writes in several genres: Western Romance, Historical Romance, Paranormal Romance and Contemporary Romance. In a past life, she wrote Gay Romance. Her books have received numerous accolades, including RWA contest finalist, Authors After Dark finalist, Top Pick of the Month and Recommended Review from many top review sites, and Best Romance Finalist from The Independent Author Network. 

Ps: For some strange reason, ghosts often show up in her stories.

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4 thoughts on “Beware the Ides of March #history #blackluck #Urban Fantasy

  1. Hey, Cathy, thanks so much for the visit on your lovely blog. Beware the Idea of March – hey,that’s today! And thanks for featuring I spy A Demon. I had a great time writing that book! Wish you oodles of success in ‘your’ future writing and blogging endeavors. ~Keta~

    1. Thanks for dropping by and being on the blog. Great post. I loved the book. Thank you and I am actually making progress. Maybe if luck smiles on me this summer. Thank you and good luck!

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